Practising bound buttonholes

Bound buttonhole red cotton

I’m working on a project that requires four bound buttonholes.

Bound buttonholes seem scary because you slice your scissors through a pattern piece. If you mess up, you mess up – and you’d better have spare fabric to hand.

So, how do you make sure that doesn’t happen. Practice!

I always practise my bound buttonholes before starting on the project itself. Even if you count yourself familiar with this technique, it’s important because you…

  • Flex your memory muscle
  • Familiarise yourself with fabric quirks
  • Prep for those details you might overlook ie ensuring that the fabric grain on your welts matches the fabric grain of your pattern piece
  • Build your confidence. Hey, I can totally do this!

If you want a good step-by-step guide to bound buttonholes, you can buy my ebook here. It’s a bargain, and covers steps such as these…

thread tracing bound buttonholes

bound buttonhole welts

sewing bound buttonholes red

turning bound buttonhole welts

Bound buttonholes definitely keep your inner perfectionist geek happy! Working with well-behaved fabric helps. More on that to come…

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5 Responses to Practising bound buttonholes

  1. Silvia says:

    I still think they’re scary! Your ebook is a great explanation, but still scary!

  2. I’ve always avoided bound buttonholes, but there was one project a while ago where I decided to go ahead and try them. They were far from perfect but much less terrifying than I expected! I should use them more often, especially since I really dislike sewing buttonholes on my current sewing machine. . .

  3. Bound is nice, piped is even better. Ann Ladbury’s method, on an old BBC video, is AMAZING, and gives very delicate buttonholes, even on bulky fabrics. Here’s the video http://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/whatwewore/5602.shtml the buttonhole part is at about 2.25, WOnderful stuff.

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